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Blogs2018-05-18T00:51:54+00:00

Facts about the Red Cross

10 Facts about the Red Cross You Probably Didn’t Know

Mar11
The Red Cross is a household name, but how much do you know about this organization? In honor of Red Cross Month, here are 10 interesting facts about the Red Cross. The Red Cross was founded in 1881 by Clara Barton. The United States government has tasked the Red Cross with providing services to the armed forces and providing disaster relief around the world. The Red Cross relieves suffering of individuals, regardless of their nationality, race, religious beliefs, class or political opinions. The American Red Cross is part of the world’s largest volunteer network found in 187 countries. By the end of World War I, almost a third of Americans had donated to the Red Cross or served as volunteers for the organization. 13.3 million pints of blood were collected by the Red Cross during World War II. When the Korean conflict ended in 1953, the Red Cross facilitated the

Myths and Misconceptions about Cancer in the Elderly

Jan24
In honor of World Cancer Day (Feb. 4, 2019), we at Towne Home Care are spreading awareness of how cancer affects the elderly. Myths about cancer abound and there are some major misconceptions about the elderly in particular. Myth: The Risk of Getting Cancer Is the Same at Any Age Actually, 9 out of 10 cancers are diagnosed in people who are 50 or older. The risk of contracting cancer definitely goes up with age. However, cancer is a global epidemic and affects people of all of ages, races and socio-economic groups. Myth: There’s No Point in Treating Cancer in the Elderly Treatment is helpful at any age. Older patients often have other health conditions which need to be taken into account when treatment is administered, but doctors are trained and experienced in dealing with these issues. Many elderly people have been successfully cured of cancer and have lived for

The Most Dangerous Room in Your House

The Most Dangerous Room in Your House

Jan03
You may be surprised to learn that your bathroom is the most dangerous room in the house. There are about 370 incidents a day of shower or tub-related accidents, and babies and the elderly are the most vulnerable. Getting In and Out of the Bath One out of every 3 adults aged 60 and older have trouble getting into the tub, and getting out can be just as big a challenge. Slippery surfaces mixed with soap, shampoo and warm water can be treacherous and the depth of the tub makes maneuvering difficult. It may be time to switch from baths to showers, since showers are easier to navigate. All you have to do is step inside. Showers can be made even safer with shower chairs, which circumvent balance problems. If the draw of the bath is that you can get clean without washing your hair, consider switching the showerhead to

Seniors Making a Difference in the Lives of Young Boys

Seniors Making a Difference in the Lives of Young Boys

Oct22
My dad’s favorite day at the senior center is Monday. That’s because on Monday afternoon, a group of boys from a neighborhood after-school club come to spend a few hours at the center. They play checkers with the seniors, hear their stories and just hang out together. Dad loves being around young people and it energizes him for the whole week. Dad is luckily of sound mind, despite being confined to a wheelchair. He is always looking for mental stimulation and activities he can enjoy. He tells me that the boys’ visits to the center are not just for the purpose of cheering up the senior citizens. In fact, the boys get as much from these visits as the seniors do. Many of these boys are from homes where the father is entirely or partially absent. They don’t get a lot of chances to interact with older male role models.

Mental Health

Caregiving, Burnout and My Mental Health

Sep20
I’ve been a caregiver for my Dad for three years now. He needs round the clock care and I’m an only child, so there’s no one else to do this job. I want to care for Dad, since I owe him so much, but that doesn’t mean that it’s easy. A year into caregiving, I realized that my emotions were all over the place. I was at once frustrated, angry, helpless, guilty and drained. I went to sleep every night thoroughly exhausted and often woke up in the middle of the night for caregiving duties. I hadn’t seen my friends in months and my social interactions consisted of a few scattered text messages from my more tenacious buddies. Then I read in a magazine that between 40 and 70% of family caregivers suffer from symptoms of clinical depression. Boy, did that make me nervous! I arranged for a friend to

Fall Coloring Page

Relax With a Fall Coloring Page

Aug28
Adult coloring has become popular in recent years, and for good reason. Coloring is extremely therapeutic. It improves mood, relieves stress and reduces agitation. It’s a great way for a caregiver to rejuvenate and relax. Senior citizens with dementia or other health problems can also benefit from coloring. It helps maintain motor function, improves dexterity, boosts hand-eye coordination and provides a sense of satisfaction. Download our fall coloring page and enjoy an hour of tranquility.

Stand Up to Cancer in Children

Stand Up to Cancer in Children

Aug12
There’s nothing scarier than discovering that your child has cancer. The word itself strikes terror in the hearts of people everywhere, and feelings of helplessness and sadness are sure to follow. But there is good news – childhood cancers are generally curable, and 84% of kids in developed countries recover. If you’re dealing with cancer in your child, here are some tips to help you get through it. Get Educated The more you know about the disease, the less scary it is. And the more information you have, the less frustrated you will be since you will know what to expect. It’s a good idea to write down everything medical professionals tell you, since you might be numb and unfocused at the time. If it’s written down, you can always refer back and refresh your memory. Hang on to Your Routine You won’t be able to continue all your activities,

Vaccines for Senior Citizens

Vaccines for Senior Citizens

Jul26
As we age, our immune systems become weaker, making it more difficult to fight off infections. Older adults are more susceptible to diseases such as the flu, shingles and pneumonia. They are also more likely to suffer from complications of these diseases, which may even lead to death. Vaccines are especially important for people suffering from chronic conditions such as heart disease or diabetes, but they are essential for all senior citizens. The following vaccines are covered by Medicare and should be given to seniors. Flu Vaccine Complications of flu combined with pneumonia are one of the top 10 causes of death for older adults. The flu vaccine is administered annually in the fall in preparation for winter. Flu season starts in November and the vaccine takes two weeks to take effect, so it’s best to get it as early in the season as possible. Ask for the higher dose

Healthy Grilling

Healthy Grilling

Jul03
A long summer day, food sizzling on the grill, talking, laughing, eating, kids playing. What could be more perfect? Whenever we have a family barbecue, we bring along my dad. He’s not very mobile these days, but we find him a seat in the shade and he enjoys the food and the atmosphere. He smiles at the grandchildren’s antics and enjoys listening to all his kids interacting. He can’t eat steak these days but boy, does he love his juicy hamburgers! I had always assumed that grilling was a really healthy way to eat. It avoids all the batter and grease of fried foods and is heavily based on spices. But then I read on WebMD that there are two disadvantages to barbecuing. The first one is that it encourages us to eat large quantities of fatty meats like sausages. The other disadvantage is that grilling forms compounds that might

Parks for the Elderly

Parks for the Elderly

Jun27
An outing to a park has many advantages for an elderly person. It gets them out of the house and out in the fresh air, it offers interaction with people of all ages and it’s a good way to get exercise. But not all parks are created equal, and some are more senior-friendly than others. So, before you take your loved one or client to a park, check whether it’s set up properly. Some to things to look out for include: Accessible Paths Paths in parks should be relatively flat (no more than a 2% grade) for seniors in wheelchairs or using walkers. They should be wide enough that an elderly person will not be forced off the path by a pedestrian or biker coming in the other direction. Spaces between paved and unpaved areas should be small so that a wheelchair or cane will not get stuck. There should